Cabled Knits Can Be Easy: Simple Knitting Cables Gauntlet Pattern

Knitting Cables Wristers For Beginners

Until I actually tried it, Knitting Cables looked really tough. Between the extra cable needles and taking stitches on and off my needles, I expected it to be the kind of work that demands my full, concentrated focus. Then, I actually tried it.

The real challenge for me was in getting over needing to use extra tools and manage stitches on and off my needles. I have a hard time with tons of extra tools no matter what I’m doing. My kitchen counters would be spacious and almost completely freed of all tools and appliances, if I had my way. (My man LOVES his kitchen gadgets!) Although I may not rule my domain exclusively in other areas, when it comes to knitting and yarn arts, I’m free to simplify as much as I desire. When I realized that I could try knitting cables without using a cable needle, the world of cabling and Aran knitting opened up.

In my quest to make cabling easy, I discovered to important principles. First, it pays to simplify. Simplify is exactly what I did to make cabled knit pattern easy…and it’s exactly what I recommend to anyone who wants to learn how to cable quickly and confidently. If you’re looking for a good beginning cable pattern, look for one in which you’re working with a four-stitch cable, which means you’ll only need to take up to 4 stitches off your needles at a time. You can use a cable needle for a 4-stitch cable, but I prefer to avoid extra tools while I’m knitting so I don’t. Instead, I re-arrange the stitches on my needles then knit them right off the needle as if they’d never left.

Second, a little practice does a long way. I personally hate creating swatches, even though I know they’re quite valuable. To me, they often feel like a throw-away piece, and thats aggravating and wasteful. Still, practicing the technique a few times before you dive into a larger piece makes a huge difference in your consistency, tension, and confidence. This set of knitted cable wristers or gauntlets is a perfect little project for practicing knitting cables and  knitted cable techniques. It’s forgiving, so if your tension isn’t perfect, no worries. You’ll use just a wee-bit of yarn, so you don’t need to go out and spend a lot of money to get your technique down. And, you’ll have a cute accessory to enjoy at the end.

If you haven’t used double-pointed needles or are completely new to knitting, try my Basic Gauntlets pattern first.

Simple Wristers/Gauntlets Pattern: Knitting Cables

Cabling doesn’t have to be super hard or complex. In this pattern, the number of stitches you’ll need to shift about on your needles is minimal, just 4 at a time, so I suggest taking them off the needle, rearranging them, then slipping them back onto the needle rather than onto a separate cabling needle. That technique makes for quicker cabling with less fumbling about with extra needles. As a beginner, those were two elements I quite appreciated. If you so desire, you can slip your cabling stitches onto a cable needle once you’ve rearranged them then knit them off the cabling needle before continuing with the row.

This pattern creates a set of gauntlets with cables that go in the opposite directions, so one is a left-handed gauntlet and the other a right-handed one.

Gauge: 5.5 stitches x 6 rows = 1” x 1” in basic ribbing pattern (K1, P1)

Tools and Materials

  • Cascadia 220 or Cascadia Heathers 220 (220 yards/200 meters per 3.5 oz/100 grams) or similar, about 25 g total.
  • US size 6/ 4.0 mm double-pointed needles
  • 1 marker

Stitches and Techniques You’ll Use for Knitting Cables

  • Norwegian Cast on
  • K=Knit stitch
  • P=Purl stitch
  • LC=Left Cable stitch, Slip 4 stitches off right needle then rearrange them so  the 3rd and 4th stitches pass behind the first two stitches, then slip them back onto the right needle. K, P, K, P.
  • RC=Right Cable stitch, slip 4 stitches off the right needle and rearrange them so the 3rd and 4th stitches pass in front of the first two stitches, then slip them back onto the right needle. K, P, K, P.
  • PM=Place marker (once the marker is placed, just move it the working needle as you work each row)

Get Started

For the Left Gauntlet

Cast on 36 stitches (12 on each of 3 dpns).

Row 1: K, PM, P, (K, P)*. *Repeat to end.

Row 2-6: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 7: RC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 8-10: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 11: RC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 12-14: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 15: RC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 16-18: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 19: RC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 20-25: K, P, repeat to end.

Bind off and weave in ends.

For the Right Gauntlet

Cast on 36 stitches (12 on each of 3 dpns).

Row 1: K, PM, P, (K, P)*. *Repeat to end.

Row 2-6: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 7: LC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 8-10: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 11: LC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 12-14: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 15: LC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 16-18: K, P, repeat to end.

Row 19: LC across four stitches, K, P, repeat to end.

Row 20-25: K, P, repeat to end.

Bind off and weave in ends.

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